News

Bixi bankruptcy a blow to bike sharing, but cities vow no disruption

By Robbie Webber Bike sharing has rapidly become a part of the urban transportation mix, easily supplementing both transit and walking for trips less than five miles. But financial problems for a large system supplier have cities wondering if their planned or already operating systems will also

Transportation impacts of energy boom not limited to road maintenance

By Bill Holloway The booming oil and natural gas industry is bringing jobs and economic development to states across the U.S. But along with the money and jobs come lots and lots of trucks. Particularly in rural areas with historically low traffic volumes, the huge numbers of trucks—often more

Protecting federal taxpayer interest; training a local workforce—L.A. Crenshaw light rail line

By Mary Ebeling Long-standing FTA and USDOT policy prohibits geographic preferences in hiring for construction projects. Historically, the dominance of federal funds on projects led to the idea that jobs paid for by national taxes should not be restricted geographically, and a policy was born.

Preparing for climate change in Massachusetts

By Chris Spahr On January 14, Governor Deval Patrick of Massachusetts announced $52 million in funding for a statewide plan to address the present and future impacts of climate change.  Citing weather events such as Tropical Storm Irene in 2011, which washed out Route 2 in North Adams and

Right-size parking calculator showcased at TRB annual meeting

By Chris McCahill How much parking is just the right amount? Developers and policymakers have mulled over this question for decades. Formulas are often passed along from town to town, or estimates are pulled from the Institute of Transportation Engineers’ Parking Generation report, now in its

Notice any suspicious people while you were driving today?

By Bill Holloway A recent study by researchers at the University of Surrey, England, finds that people traveling through urban areas by car have more extreme positive and negative perceptions of their surroundings and people in the area than those traveling by foot, with the views of transit

Four minutes less walking to DC Metro worth 30 percent more rent

By Robbie Webber How much is 1000 feet worth when walking to the office? If you are leasing office space in the Reston-Ballston Metro corridor in Arlington, Virginia, there is up to a 30 percent premium to being that much closer to the station. Many buildings claim to be “steps from Metro,”

Connecticut DOT earns national recognition for roundabout conversion

By Chris McCahill Rotaries—or large, high-speed traffic circles—are common in Northeastern states and are scattered throughout the U.S. In light of their poor performance and safety record, however, some transportation agencies are ditching rotaries in favor of smaller modern roundabouts. In

SSTI and SGA update “The Innovative DOT”

SSTI and Smart Growth America continue working with state DOTs and tracking innovative strategies for meeting 21st century transportation needs. These strategies are outlined in a newly updated edition of The Innovative DOT: A Handbook of Policy and Practice, released this week. Transportation

Milwaukee’s transit-jobs mismatch

By Chris Spahr Milwaukee’s growth pattern and the location of business hubs in the suburbs, combined with reduced funding for transit, have created a “spatial mismatch” in the metro area.  The term “spatial mismatch” is defined in a new report by the Milwaukee-based Public Policy Forum