News

Results of an income-based fare policy show potential for wider adoption

By Mary Ebeling Most transit agencies offer some type of discounted fare; typically for seniors or students, and occasionally for low-income customers. In the Seattle region, King County Transit, Sound Transit, and other regional agencies have partnered to launch a first in the nation program

Foxx decries highways’ effects on cities; US DOT can help the cause with rulemaking

By Eric Sundquist In a widely covered March 29 speech and interviews, U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx described some of the negative effects that highway building has had on cities— particularly middle- and lower-income neighborhoods. The former Charlotte, N.C., mayor recalled his

Beset by complaints, BART’s Twitter resorts to unvarnished honesty

By Eric Sundquist The Bay Area Rapid Transit system’s Twitter account went viral March 16 when, faced with a larger than usual number of complaints, it began responding like this: CHRISTOPHER CHAPPEL ‎@shakatron .@SFBART we’ve come to expect rush-hour equipment problems and train delays

Data scientists target serious crashes in four U.S. cities

By Chris McCahill Microsoft has teamed with DataKind, a nonprofit organization that connects communities with skilled data scientists, to reduce traffic-related deaths and serious injuries in four U.S. cities. The effort, which first launched in New York City last August, will expand to San Jose,

Does urban sprawl inhibit upward mobility?

By Robbie Webber A study by Reid Ewing, Shima Hamidi, et al. published in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning lends more support to the idea that sprawl can be a deterrent to upward mobility, making it difficult for low-income residents to improve their economic circumstances. Compact metro

New research on the benefits of ignition interlock devices

By Mary Ebeling New research from the University of Pennsylvania finds that states that have passed laws requiring ignition-interlock devices (IIDs) for all drivers convicted of drunk driving have seen a collective 15 percent drop in deaths from drunk-driving crashes compared with rates in states

Mobile apps gaining ground in trucking

By Bill Holloway Rapid growth in the use of mobile apps is changing the trucking business and could bring congestion reduction benefits as well as efficiency gains. As noted in Intransition Magazine, the way truckers with empty trailers find available loads has come a long way from notes on truck

U.S. 36: Changing commute habits through infrastructure, incentives, and education

By Mary Ebeling The Colorado Department of Transportation is putting the final touches on the reconstruction of U.S. 36 between Denver and Boulder, and their efforts to both accommodate and encourage alternatives to driving alone in the corridor seem to be working. Completed by CDOT, the Regional

To improve transit in U.S., improve regional coordination: Lessons from across the pond

By Mary Ebeling Recent work out of Virginia Tech compares approaches in large metropolitan regions in Europe and the U.S., seeking to identify best practices for improving regional transit service. Case study examples for Europe include regional public transport associations—Verkehrsverbünde,

Megaships may be approaching their maximum size

By Bill Holloway The largest container ship ever to call at a North American port, the CMA CGM Benjamin Franklin, visited the ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles, and Seattle last month. At 1306 feet long, 177 feet wide, and 197 feet tall, the ship is among the largest in the world and can carry