News

Decentralized by design: When should we consider ditching exclusive radial bus routes?

By Mary Ebeling In the past, development and commute patterns required transit—bus or rail—to bring commuters into densely developed central cities. However, over the last 50 years, many metropolitan areas in the U.S. experienced a decentralized urban settlement and growth into less dense

Smart Growth America helps Tennessee with familiar problem: Many projects and limited funds

By Robbie Webber A technical assistance report from Smart Growth America revealed that Tennessee DOT has a problem: nine times more projects in its work plan than it has funding. They needed an analysis of which projects were a priority and how some needs might be addressed by less expensive

New generation of transit hubs redefining train stations’ place in communities

By Bill Holloway Whereas the grand train stations of yesteryear were monuments to transportation with their soaring cathedral-like ceilings, huge open spaces, and rows of wooden benches – today’s transit hubs have both a new aesthetic and role in their communities. They often link multiple

Bike share programs’ support of transit constrained by FTA funding rules

By Mary Ebeling The benefits to transit riders of having bike racks on buses and trains and bike storage at transit stops are well known. New bike share programs offer another opportunity to provide better access to public transit, bridging the important “last mile” between trip origins and

Highway congestion highest on Friday afternoon

By Eric Sunquist Car commuters in most large metro areas face the highest level of highway congestion on Friday afternoon, according to Inrix data provided to Governing magazine. In Los Angeles – the city with the worst traffic – a 30-minute auto trip in traffic-free conditions becomes a

Productivity of trains as mobile offices a factor in mode selection

By Robbie Webber Although driving or flying may be faster door-to-door, trains offer something those modes do not: uninterrupted time to work. And this additional work time is starting to be a factor in transportation mode choice for many workers. Although many people attempt to work while

“War on cars” (or bicycles) isn’t new

By Robbie Webber A recent NPR story asked if there was really a “war on cars.” This idea seems to appear in newspaper comments, on radio talk shows, and as opinion pieces whenever funding is moved from highway capacity expansion to transit, parking fees are raised, or street right of way is

Reform STIP documents for greater transparency

By Bill Holloway The Tri-State Transportation Campaign recently released its new report and website, Tracking State Transportation Dollars, which evaluates the Statewide Transportation Improvement Programs (STIPs) of all 50 states. Although analyses of individual state STIPs are useful in

Climate impacts on transportation a hot topic during a hot summer

By Eric Sundquist Amid this summer’s wildfires, drought and heat wave, many news articles and scholarly reports have focused on the changing climate’s effects on transportation. With temperatures lingering above 100 degrees F in the upper Midwest, reports of closed roads due to buckling

ACEEE finds U.S. ranks last in energy efficiency in transportation

By Mary Ebeling A new report from the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy finds that, among 12 major world economies analyzed for the report, the U.S. ranks dead last in the energy efficiency of its transportation sector. Improving transportation’s energy efficiency hinges on