Internet-connected vehicles may put hackers in the driver’s seat

By Robbie Webber A pair of researchers remotely attacked a Jeep Cherokee and disabled the accelerator on the Interstate outside St. Louis to demonstrate that increasingly-wired cars need better security. Although they are sharing their software hack with Chrysler so the company can patch the

Study confirms that 10-foot lanes make safer intersections

By Chris McCahill Side impact- and turn-related crash rates are lowest at intersections where average lane widths are between 10 and 10.5 feet, according to a study presented at the Canadian Institute of Transportation’s annual meeting last month. This challenges the long-held, but often

Trombino: “System is going to shrink”

By Eric Sundquist Iowa DOT Secretary Paul Trombino created a minor wave in the blogosphere last week when he told an Urban Land Institute audience that the state’s highway and rail system was too big to maintain and would need to shrink. An excerpt of Trombino’s speech, as reported by Charles

Compact, connected development patterns on the rise since mid-1990s

By Chris McCahill Low density, disconnected development patterns—or sprawl—peaked in the mid-1990s, then declined by as much as 9 percent in the following decades, according to a new analysis of street patterns published by the National Academy of Sciences. Because of its innovative

It’s not all about the mode: Race and gender bias in yielding to non-motorized road users

By Mary Ebeling Two recent studies suggest that bias in driver behavior toward other road users could be contributing to enhanced stress levels for certain groups of pedestrians and bicyclists. Recent research documents a difference in drivers yielding to pedestrians based on race in Portland,

Austin, Texas sees road safety and operations improvements with “right sizing”

By Robbie Webber Austin, Texas has released a report detailing their 15-year effort to “right size” streets throughout the city, and the results have been positive. Travel times on the studied segments have not increased, crashes are down by as much as 38 percent, and high-risk speeding has

Vermont taking steps to reduce the number of drivers with suspended licenses

By Bill Holloway The Vermont Agency of Transportation is working to reduce the number of state residents with suspended licenses. As reported by Vermont Public Radio, there are about 30,000 Vermonters with suspended licenses at any time in the state with 626,000 people. The majority of these

Virginia adopts multimodal, competitive project scoring process

By Eric Sundquist Last year Virginia enacted legislation to select state-supported transportation projects through a multimodal, competitive process. State-of-good-repair projects, such as bridge and pavement rehabilitation, as well as highway safety projects, were exempt. But a wide range of

New study links low-cost and free recreation facilities near work sites with active commuting

By Bill Holloway A recently released study from researchers at Washington University in St. Louis has added further detail to our understanding of the link between commuting mode choice and workplace and environmental variables. The study relied on phone interviews with 1,338 commuters living in

Equitable access to opportunity: The growing distance between people and jobs

By Mary Ebeling Recent studies show that travel times and costs for all commuters are increasing, particularly in the past five years. A recent Citi Premier commuter index documents commuting costs an average of $2,600 per year, or around $12 a day. These costs are regressive in nature, creating