The Innovative DOT: A Handbook of Policy and Practice (SSTI & SGA, 2015)

Innovative DOT 2015 homepage

SSTI and Smart Growth America continue working with state departments of transportation and tracking innovative strategies for meeting 21st century transportation needs. The 2015 edition of The Innovative DOT builds upon its predecessor with updated content and fresh new ideas from a growing number of states. Read More >

Getting the Goods Without the Bads: Freight Transportation Demand Management Strategies to Reduce Urban Impacts (SSTI, 2013)

Univ Ave Truck_frontpage

This project, funded by SSTI with a matching grant from the Center for Freight Infrastructure Research and Education (CFIRE), identifies and evaluates strategies to reduce the social costs associated with goods movement in urban areas by managing freight transportation demand. Read More >

Reimagining a legacy transit system: Lessons from Wilmington, Delaware (SSTI and DelDOT, 2013)

Gillig at Wilmington Train Station - for web

At the request of the Delaware Department of Transportation, SSTI provided an independent review of transit services and transit routes in Wilmington, Delaware and was asked to made recommendations for improvements. This study lays out recommendations for system operations and infrastructure improvements, and points out directions that can help position DART to function as an integral part of the city’s and region’s transportation system. Read More >


FEATURED RESOURCE

VMT Inflection Point: Factors Affecting 21st Century Travel (SSTI, 2013)

For many decades, transportation planning has assumed continued increases in automobile use. Now, in a major reversal, the average American is driving considerably less. No one can predict the future with certainty, but there are many reasons to think that VMT trends will not revert to the 20th century trend. This paper lists some of those reasons, with references to supporting literature. More Resources...

NEWS

NJDOT uses flexibility, community engagement to build context-sensitive interchange

When $17 million in funding was set aside for a new interchange on NJ Route 42 in suburban Camden County in 2005, NJDOT’s design concepts involved traditional clover leaf and diamond designs to improve automobile level of service and mobility. However, after engaging the community in a dialog about their vision for the future of the area—which focused on increasing development near the interchange and creating a more walkable environment—planners and designers settled on a more context-sensitive solution that would slow traffic, preserve land for development, and set the stage for a grid roadway network. Read More >

Expanding alternatives: Interregional express bus service hits the road in Colorado

Bustang, Colorado DOT’s new interregional express bus service is part of the agency’s continuing effort to manage congestion on the I-25 and I-70 corridors. It is also part of the agency’s response to the growing public demand for transportation options for these congested highways. Read More >

Politico examines Wisconsin’s “Love Affair with Overpasses”

The transportation record of a prominent presidential candidate is the jumping off point for a lengthy, critical report on American transportation policy in Politico last week. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker recently proposed to dramatically increase borrowing in order to support several highway megaprojects in southern Wisconsin. But the Politico article points out that the size of the budget is not the only, or even the most important, issue—both in Wisconsin and in Washington. Read More >

Internet-connected vehicles may put hackers in the driver’s seat

A pair of researchers remotely attacked a Jeep Cherokee and disabled the accelerator on the Interstate outside St. Louis to demonstrate that increasingly-wired cars need better security. Although connection to the internet is becoming a sought-after feature on cars, it may also allow hackers a portal into the car’s onboard computer and its controls. Read More >

Study confirms that 10-foot lanes make safer intersections

Side impact- and turn-related crash rates are lowest at intersections where average lane widths are between 10 and 10.5 feet, according to a study presented at the Canadian Institute of Transportation’s annual meeting last month. This challenges the long-held, but often disputed, assumption that wider lanes are safer. Read More >

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