The Innovative DOT: A Handbook of Policy and Practice (SSTI & SGA, 2014)

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SSTI and Smart Growth America continue working with state departments of transportation and tracking innovative strategies for meeting 21st century transportation needs. The 2014 edition of The Innovative DOT builds upon its predecessor with updated content and fresh new ideas from a growing number of states. Read More >

Getting the Goods Without the Bads: Freight Transportation Demand Management Strategies to Reduce Urban Impacts (SSTI, 2013)

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This project, funded by SSTI with a matching grant from the Center for Freight Infrastructure Research and Education (CFIRE), identifies and evaluates strategies to reduce the social costs associated with goods movement in urban areas by managing freight transportation demand. Read More >

Reimagining a legacy transit system: Lessons from Wilmington, Delaware (SSTI and DelDOT, 2013)

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At the request of the Delaware Department of Transportation, SSTI provided an independent review of transit services and transit routes in Wilmington, Delaware and was asked to made recommendations for improvements. This study lays out recommendations for system operations and infrastructure improvements, and points out directions that can help position DART to function as an integral part of the city’s and region’s transportation system. Read More >


FEATURED RESOURCE

VMT Inflection Point: Factors Affecting 21st Century Travel (SSTI, 2013)

For many decades, transportation planning has assumed continued increases in automobile use. Now, in a major reversal, the average American is driving considerably less. No one can predict the future with certainty, but there are many reasons to think that VMT trends will not revert to the 20th century trend. This paper lists some of those reasons, with references to supporting literature. More Resources...

NEWS

Location, location, location: Financing transit with real estate assets

The recent economic recession reduced available funding for every transportation mode. For transit, however, these funding reductions coincided with marked increases in ridership. This has pushed agencies to take a broad look at available funding options. Tapping agency-owned real estate as a revenue generator is one option. Read More >

Hand-held cell phone bans miss the mark

According to recently published research, California’s ban on driving while using hand-held cellphones, implemented in 2008, appears to have had no impact on crash rates. Despite the dubious effectiveness, 14 states currently prohibit all drivers from using hand-held cellphones. This focus on hand-held devices, while largely ignoring the risks associated with hands-free phones, is misguided. A literature review conducted by researchers at Dalhousie University in Canada in 2009 concluded that, based on available research, the use of hands-free cellphones is no safer than using hand-held phones while driving. Read More >

Tennessee uses software to predict crashes

The Tennessee Highway Patrol has begun using software that will predict where crashes and other safety problems will occur. However, instead of simply identifying problem locations over the long term, the model looks at four-hour segments and 30 square mile areas. This allows police officers and resources to be efficiently dispatched to specific areas to either prevent or respond to anticipated high-risk situations. Read More >

Lower income neighborhoods hit hardest by pedestrian deaths

According to national data, pedestrian deaths increased by 15 percent between 2009 and 2012 and have made up a growing share of all traffic deaths over the past decade. That is particularly troubling news for lower income neighborhoods, which experience the highest death rates in their regions, according to a new analysis by Governing. A majority of the responsible crashes took place on national, state, and county routes, the study also found. Read More >

Can passenger and freight rail coexist?

Amtrak is dealing with a steadily increasing problem of service delays. Timing conflicts with freight sharing the same tracks are a significant factor. A law passed by Congress in 2008 sets Amtrak on-time performance standards and considers any number below 80 percent as substandard. This same law requires that freight railroads give Amtrak priority on their tracks and allows Amtrak to penalize freight rail providers for giving dispatch priority to freight trains on Amtrak routes. However, a July 2013 U.S. Court of Appeals decision ended Amtrak’s power over freight lines, which has greatly contributed to the decline in on-time performance. Read More >

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